Monday, April 7, 2014

climb the mountains

Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnmuir393393.html#Y2vwxxhXzWEv28M4.99
Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. 
Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. 
The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy,
while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.  
John Muir

future photographer

We took a day trip up to Banff National Park with my nephew and mom yesterday. My nephew is an amazing photographer, and he loves it. What more can you ask for in life, than to be able to work doing what you love?
J was his assistant for the day. He had such a good time, not only learning about the camera and the shots, but hanging out with one of his favourite people. Family is where it is, folks.

See more here David Wilder Photography. 

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

reflection

“Reflection must be reserved for solitary hours; whenever she was alone,
she gave way to it as the greatest relief; and not a day went by without a solitary walk,
in which she might indulge in all the delight of unpleasant recollections.”
Jane Austen

Saturday, March 8, 2014

warmth and sunshine... and i feel fine

We have been in a very cold place lately... freezing temperatures and dark days. Most of the time I enjoy winter. I enjoy the snow and the outdoor activities that come along with it. But having day upon day of minus 20 (and lower) temperatures puts a damper on things. Time spent outside is limited, and spirits become low. 

But today we have been given a gift. The gift of warmth and sunshine.
And I feel fine.



I hope you have sunshine where ever you are today.

Monday, February 10, 2014

where things get better

Sometimes life is hard.*

As much positive energy as we put out there, sometimes life is hard. And that's just the way it goes. It is a part of being alive... of being human. Things hurt us, turn us upside down, and make us feel worn down.

It happens.


There is so much talk out there about being positive and focusing on the good. And that is excellent advise, don't get me wrong. But feelings happen. Sadness happens. And it doesn't make you a failure because you feel this way. It makes you human.

I find that there is good in sadness. And no matter how bad you think things are... things get better. They always do. And you know this. You know how these cycles work. You know how you got to this place... and you know how to get out.

It is the mind that keeps us there. Those thoughts of just how bad it really is. The constant chattering of your brain, reliving that moment or dreaming up bad things that might happen. And with each thought we slip deeper into that dark place.

Be still... we must be still. We must breathe, and let things flow as they will. Go somewhere quiet. Maybe a hidden park, or a wooded forest, or a field with wild flowers, or even a snowy mountain valley.


Go there. And just sit quietly for some time. Do not think. Just be for awhile. And see how you feel.

These are the places where it gets better.

*A note to myself, during a rather stressful time.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

a snow covered river

I stand by the river and I know that it has been here yesterday and will be here tomorrow and that therefore, since I am part of its pattern today, I also belong to all its yesterdays and will be a part of all its tomorrows. This is a kind of earthly immortality, a kinship with rivers and hills and rocks, with all things and all creatures that have ever lived or ever will live or have their being on the earth. It is my assurance of an orderly continuity in the great design of the universe. — (Virginia Eifert)

This is but a small glimpse of this river... covered in ice and snow.

Thursday, January 9, 2014

let them be

Living close to the mountains, and next to a provincial park, means we see a lot of wildlife. We are lucky... blessed even. For seeing wildlife in their natural environments is a gift. A glimpse into nature's own heart. Whenever we make our drive from Calgary to Lake Louise, or up toward Jasper, we always hope to see a bear or a moose in the bush. Or even a mountain goat, which we have seen many times.

And sometimes we even get a visitor in our own backyard.
We saw this little guy and his friends over the holidays, just meters from our home. They visit often, and we are thrilled each time. But we never bother them, we never approach them, and we certainly never feed them.

If you love wildlife... let them be.

A couple of days ago I read an article (here's the link) about people who were baiting wolves along the Bow Valley Parkway in Banff National Park. These people offered these wild creatures a feast of home cooked turkey, in an apparent attempt to get a photo. And sadly, this is not the first time something like this has happened.

This upsets me. Our love for these animals sometimes makes us do things that aren't always in the best interest of the animal. We want to somehow be close to these beautiful creatures. But so many people do not understand the implications of getting too close and feeding wild animals. And some simply do not care. Feeding any wild animal, whether it be a deer or a wolf, is a bad idea. It can lead to dependency, loss of fear of humans (which means more contact), health problems with the animals, and the attraction of more wild animals to the area. It isn't safe for humans or the animals.

In fact, it is illegal to feed, entice, or disturb any animal in a national park.

If you are fortunate enough to see wildlife, that's great! But please keep your distance. If you can safely do it, take a photo. Or better yet, simple observe... because you have been given a glimpse into nature's belly. But do not get too close, and never bait them to get a better look.

The article I read listed safe distances to keep, according to The Parks Canada Code of Ethics:
It suggests photographers — whether amateur or professional — keep a safe distance: 100 metres from bears; 30 metres from other large species; and 200 metres from coyote, fox or wolf dens.
There are fines for feeding wildlife, which can go as high as $25,000.

If you love wild life... let them be.



Read more here: Parks Canada.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

the temple

I saw this short film this morning and immediately loved it... identified with it. So I thought I would share it.


Happy New Year, by the way.